Labyrinth

The Labyrinth at The Foundation of Light

Dating as far back as 1250 B.C., labyrinths have been used throughout history, in various shapes and sizes, and in cultures ranging from Egypt to China. Many are familiar with the turf labyrinths and hedge mazes scattered throughout the British Isles, but the symbol is also found on coins, woven into Hopi baskets, on the coasts of Sweden and Finland; in medieval European manuscripts.  Poets such as Ovid, Petrarch, and Lady Mary Wroth have drawn the motif of the labyrinth as salvation, entrapment, or development of the soul.

Walking a labyrinth’s many turns reflect the journey of life, which involves change and transition, rites of passage, cycles of nature. Different from a maze – which has dead ends and false passages – the labyrinth has a single path that leads unerringly to the center.  It shows us that no time or effort is wasted; if we stay the course, every step, however circuitous, takes us closer to our center. As reaching the center is assured, walking the labyrinth is more about the journey than the destination, about being rather than doing, harmonizing movements of the body, turns of the mind, and self-discovery of the human spirit.

Curious about maintenance? The Labyrinth paths match the width of a push-mower. Since its construction, the Labyrinth has been maintained by weekly volunteers who push the mower along the path to the Labyrinth’s center. In less than half an hour you can perform community service, get exercise, and be in a state of meditative awareness. Contact us if you’d like to help.

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